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Lighting Control Code Update: 2018 IECC

It seems like only a couple of months ago that designers, contractors and inspectors in the state of Colorado were settling into the 2015 IECC code changes. Just as dimming, daylight harvesting, site lighting reduction and vacancy sensing were becoming routine, the International Code Council released the 2018 IECC. Never a dull moment in the construction industry!

Do not fear, Coloradoans – the city of Denver and the state of Colorado have not released any indication that they will be adopting this code anytime soon. It is unlikely that Denver will adopt since 2015 was just adopted last year, but it never hurts to educate ourselves on where things will be headed in the future.

Below is our overview of the major changes in the 2018 IECC as it relates to lighting control systems. Please contact us with any and all feedback on this review, as we always love a good code discussion here at Visual Integration

1.  NEW: Luminaire level lighting controls (LLLC). New language in the code provides detail on the OPTION to use fixture-integrated controls.

  1. Occupancy sensors to brighten/dim based on occupancy.
  2. Ambient sensor to brighten/dim based on available daylight.
  3. Bright/dim setpoints, timeouts, fade rates, sensitivities, and wireless zoning must be configurable.
Philips SpaceWise fixture-integrated control technology qualifies for the LLLC option. (Photo by Philips Lighting). 

Philips SpaceWise fixture-integrated control technology qualifies for the LLLC option. (Photo by Philips Lighting). 

2. NEW: Occupant sensor controls now required in open offices. C405.2.1.3.

  1. General lighting controlled separately in control zones with floor areas not greater than 600SF.
  2. Turn off within 20-minutes after space is unoccupied.
  3. Reduce light output by not less than 80% (sweeping off does comply).
  4. Daylight sensors will only activate once occupancy sensors turn lights on.
The open office occupancy sensor requirement is one of the most significant impacts on the design and cost of lighting control systems under the new code. (Photo by Philips Lighting). 

The open office occupancy sensor requirement is one of the most significant impacts on the design and cost of lighting control systems under the new code. (Photo by Philips Lighting). 

3.  CHANGE: Occupant sensor timeout minimum is now 20-minutes (previously 30-minutes). C405.2.1.1.

4.   NEW: Exception for daylight-responsive controls. C405.2.3.

  1. New buildings where the total connected lighting power allowance equation: LPAadj = LPAnorm x (1.0 – 0.4 x UDZFA/TBFA). RE: C405.2.3 for full equation and information.
  2. New adjusted lighting power allowance equation: LPAadj = LPAnorm x (1.0 – 0.4 x UDZFA/TBFA). RE: C405.2.3 for full equation and information.

5.   NEW: Daylight control functions. C405.2.3.1.

  1. When we have daylight controls in offices, classrooms, labs, library reading rooms – must dim continuously down to 15% output or lower.
  2. Daylight controls must be able to completely shut off all controlled lights.
Not too much has changed in the daylighting world, other than we have a new exception. (Photo by LumenHub). 

Not too much has changed in the daylighting world, other than we have a new exception. (Photo by LumenHub). 

6.  NEW: Special applications controls. C405.2.4.

  1. Display & accent lighting must be controlled via time-switch or occupant controls.
  2. Task lighting must be controlled via time-switch or occupant controls.
  3. Lighting that is for sale or for education must be controlled via time-switch or occupant controls.
  4. Sleeping units shall have occupant sensor controls to sweep off fixtures and controlled receptacles within 20-minutes of vacancy.
  5. Dwelling units shall comply with C405.2.1.1 (occupancy sensors) or C405.2.2.2 (timeswitch controls).
  6. Non-visual lighting (plant grown/food warming) shall have timeswitch controls independent from other lighting in the space.
This is the first time the IECC has provided requirements for dwelling units. Crestron Pyng is the  perfect solution for your multi-family units or residential projects. (Photo by Crestron Electronics). 

This is the first time the IECC has provided requirements for dwelling units. Crestron Pyng is the  perfect solution for your multi-family units or residential projects. (Photo by Crestron Electronics). 

7.  NEW: Exterior decorative lighting shutoff. Façade and landscape lighting shall automatically shutoff 1-hour after business closing to 1-hour before business opening.

We would hate to sweep off our Color Kinetics façade lighting at night - hoping for an exception in a future code release. (Photo by Philips Color Kinetics). 

We would hate to sweep off our Color Kinetics façade lighting at night - hoping for an exception in a future code release. (Photo by Philips Color Kinetics). 

 
For any questions on controls, reach out to our controls team, Visual Integration
2018 IECC Lighting Control Code Update blog by Alyssa Weber - Controls Manager
alyssa@visualinterest.com
Scott Hill